Sunday, December 23, 2012

Review of the Bose®- Limited Edition QuietComfort® 15 Noise Cancelling® Headphones- Blue

I have resisted buying any Bose products for a long time. I have had tons of other headphones that were uncomfortable and that hurt my head and ears. I have a drawer full of headphones that either have a short in the fixed wired cables or simply sound bad. I have at least one other noise canceling headset that literally do not cancel out any noise; there is no audible difference heard after the switch is turned on.If I added up the money that I've spent for all those bad headphones, I could have the Bose® QuietComfort 15 Acoustic Noise Cancelling® Headphones - Limited Edition a long time ago (maybe even two sets).

I actually visited the Bose store at the Great Lakes Crossing Mall and tried out the Bose QuietComfort 3 Headphones, which are the "on the ear" style of headphones. The Bose QC3 has a built-in rechargeable battery which is very nice. I decided I liked the Bose QC 15's "around the ear" feel a little better, so I would deal with disposable batteries.
Bose QC15 Headphones
I am not an audiophile, but I enjoy my music. I have over 2,000 songs on my iPad, my iMac and iPhone. I listen to even more music on the Pandora app. I love listening to my music without limits. Sometime I like blasting my music throughout the whole house via the Apple TV and my surround sound home theater system. Other times, I use my Jambone Jambox to keep my device on the charger while I carry the speaker from room to room. Still other times I like the music to be personal and streamed directly and personally into only my ears. I have never liked Apple's included earphones; the old ones or the new ones. Wearing Apple's version is like wearing two sticks in my ears. The Bose QuietComfort 15 Headphones are like having soft pillows on my ears. Two soft pillows that emit awesome music and/or audio, that is.

I spend my most of my time listening to podcasts on my iPhone using the Stitcher Radio app. Podcasts satisfy my listening pleasures, as well as, offer a convenient way for me to stay informed of my topics of interest.

I also enjoy watching movies and watching episodes TV shows on my mobile devices. The Bose QuietComfort 15 Headphones are a wonderful addition to my world. They sound beautiful and are so comfortable thatI hardy know I am wearing them. I am tender headed and most headphones hurt the top of my head (especially more that my head is less covered with hair these days).  I enjoy watching movies as well.  I have many options for viewing movies on my iOS devices. I use the Crackle app, the Hulu Plus app and the Netflix app to stream content from the Internet. I also have my own movies on my Seagate FreeAgent GoFlex 1.5TB USB hard drive and mounted on my iMac 21" desktop computer. I stream these movies to the iPad and iPhone using the AirVideo app for iOS. Additionally, I stream the same movies to my Jailbroken Apple TV and to my Roku streaming device, but I don't use the Bose headphone on the TV sets. I do them if I watch the movies or training videos directly on the iMac.
The Limited Edition has a Blue Leather case.

I am always listening to something in my spare time. I also enjoy listening to audio books through the Audible.com (an Amazon.com company) app on my devices. Let's not forget that I love playing games on my iOS devices. Whether I am playing Kingdom Rush HD, Asphalt 7, Need for Speed - Hot Pursuit (I haven't tried Need for Speed™ Most Wanted yet, but I want to soon), The Walking Dead - The Game, Plants and Zombies HD or Osmos for iPad; it just sounds better with the Bose QuietComfort 15 headphones. 

 I elected to get the limited edition Blue version of the Bose QuietComfort 15 because a splash of color never hurt any gadget. It would have been better if it was red; maybe a Product RED version? That would be nice!

But the Bose®- Limited Edition QuietComfort® 15 Noise Cancelling® Headphones - Blue is a nice looking addition to any gadget collection. Why get the one everyone has?

What's Included

  • Bose® Limited Edition QuietComfort 15 Acoustic Noise Canceling Headphones
  • AAA battery
  • In-line remote and microphone cable, 
  • audio cable, 
  • airline adapter
  • Limited Edition Blue Leather-like Carrying case
  • Owner's manual
  • Courtesy Cards (ads to pass on the interested parties)

The blue version is much better looking to me than the normal silver version. The blue color was added to both the headphones as well as to the carrying case. It is very peculiar that neither the Bose site nor any of the other reviewer of the Limited Edition version of the QuietComfort® 15 Noise Cancelling® Headphones mentioned the blue leather carrying case.


Not sure if it is real leather or not, but it is a nicer look and feel than the black standard non-leather like carrying case.

The Blue Limited Edition looks nice.

Built in moldings protect the cushions' shape.
I love these headphones and I couldn't wait to use them on my daily commute to and from work. I ride the commuter bus to and from work; about 45 minutes to an hour each way. 99% of the riders are professionals with a few students here and there. The crowd is fairly quiet, but we all from time to time get pretty chatty. It is nice to be able to just erase all of the conversation from the ride; with the help of the Bose QuietComfort 15 headphones. Just turn these babies on and every outside sound just cease to be heard. It is surprising how much noise is generated from the bus and environment alone. The bus hums, squeaks and beeps without much help from the passengers. The traffic noise alone is annoying once you have lived without hearing it. Sometimes I think, for a quick second, about not taking out the Bose QuietComfort 15 headphones and just using my normal ear-gear. That thought doesn't last long. It is easy to get spoiled quickly with these headphones. It is very nice to just put the headphones on, turn on the power and enjoy the peace; even without any music or audio playing. Sometimes I put on the WhiteNoise Pro app and just listen to the train sound. Other times I play the white noise sound and read a book or catch up on the news from the Flipboard app or the Zite apps.

Typically I listen to my audio via my LH HBS-700 Bluetooth wireless headphones. They are the headset I use when I am mobile. When I am stationary for even just a little while, I prefer the Bose QuietComfort 15 headphones. The Bose QuietComfort 15 headphones have very nice sound quality and the noise canceling feature is topnotch. With winter here in Detroit, I sometimes just wear the Bose QuietComfort 15 headphones as my earmuffs.

A few days ago, my family was decorating the Christmas tree as I type this review and I couldn't hear any of their constant chatter; except very faintly between songs. With a wife and two preteens girls, I finally have a escape that doesn't remove me from the room. You can put on any pair of headphones and blast them into your ears to block out any noise. Of course that is not enjoyable to the person with the headphone on or those around them. Setting the volume at about 25% on my iPhone 5 is a very comfortable level to listen to my music when at home while the family is watching television. My daughter was sitting directly next to me and could not hear my music until I went one notch over the 50% volume level.

Other $299 headphones, that I've tried, claims to block out noise, but they don't. Those other headphones blast your ears with high volume to be louder than the other noises around you. The noise canceling is obvious the very second you place the Bose QuietComfort 15 headphones on your ears. Even without the music playing, you will be aware of the removal of the sounds around you. It focuses on certain sounds to cancel them. I can have the TV on and turn the headphones on and I can hear the voice from the TV without the other noises in the room. It is wild.

The Bose QuietComfort 15 headphones are nice looking. The have a very sophisticated or distinguished look to them. The Beats and other headsets add color to their headphones or boost the Bass to appear hip and youthful (the opposite of crowd I believe the Bose brand tries to appeal to).

Pros
  • Very Comfortable
  • Quality Sound
  • Industry best Noise Canceling
  • Two cables included; one with inline control for iOS devices
  • Detachable and replaceable cable
  • Only require a single AAA
  • High quality carrying case
  • Includes Airplane audio adapter

Cons
  • Requires a battery to use at all
  • No auto-power off feature

The $299 price of the headset can not be considered a cons because most of the headphones that would compete with this headphone in the open market are priced the same.

Other Headphones in the range include:

I tried all of the above out before I settled on the Bose.  I felt the Bose satisfied my need for a comfortable, great sounding headphone with fantastic noise canceling. I liked that the Parrot Zik had touch controls and was wireless, but I couldn't justify the extra $100 for those two features.  The sound and noise canceling would have had to have been considerable better.  They weren't even at the same level.

The only complaints I could muster up is the fact that the headphones are totally unusable when the battery is dead or not present. Bose does include a battery with the purchase. It is nice that it only requires a single AAA battery, but it is a bummer that the headphones do not offer an auto-off feature. I have fallen a sleep with the headset on and the battery continued to drained through my fast. It would nice if there was a switch to have the headset turn itself off after a certain amount of time.

I am extremely pleased with the Bose QuietComfort 15 Acoustic Noise Canceling Headphones. I would recommend them to anyone wishing to have a pair of comfortable, nice sounding headphones that block out the unnecessary background noises to allow the audio content to be enjoyed.




Friday, December 21, 2012

GQ Live - Makes the old fashion magazine relevant and current

I was at Target yesterday browsing the magazine stand for some gadget related magazines, but I couldn't find any. Then the December 2012 GQ magazine caught my eye. It had Rihanna on the cover; who mysteriously
appears to be getting younger instead of older.

Anyway, I was flipping through the pages in search of the Rihanna article so that I could "read" the story. As you may know, magazines are designed so that the story pages are physically shorter in width so that they hide between the ad pages. Other way to put it; the ads are designed to be seen above any article.

Since I couldn't avoid looking at the ads, I paid one of them more attention than I wanted to. I noticed that the ad had a GQ Live app marking on the page. Upon further investigating I found that the free GQ Live app for Apple iOS and Android, would make certain pages come alive. I couldn't wait to download the app to my iPhone 5 (luckily I switched from Sprint to Verizon or I would have had to wait because Sprint service does not work well at all in that store). I downloaded the app fairly quickly and began trying the app and the magazine out. The app's interface is very simple; it looks like a basic camera app. It uses the back camera on the device to "see" the image
on the magazine page. When it recognizes the image, it transforms the page into a living video. This technology allows a stagnate picture to provide much more information to the reader than it would otherwise.

Along with this, this technology obviously provides the advertiser with important information that the normal page couldn't capture. like whether a reader viewed the page at all, reveal at what point the reader stop watching the page, did the viewer stop viewing before the intended message was provided.

Since the information is streaming from the Internet, it could be modified to better convey the message. I noticed on GQ's website that the streamed content does have a expiration date. Not sure why it does, but I would guess it expires after the period that the advertiser paid for it to be available.

The GQ live content appears to be made with advertising as the focus, but there were articles with "live" content. But clearly the majority, maybe 95% of the GQ Live content was added to the ads. I did find the Rihanna article, but I was not able to check it out at all because I had to find a flat surface to lay the magazine out so that I could point the phone at it. The content pages that I found were all about Rihanna, but she was nearly naked on all of the pages.

How would that have looked to the other shoppers, with me standing over a magazine with my phone taking pictures of the young naked girl on the pages. Dirty old man! I didn't think I was old at 46, but the pictures of Rihanna made her look like she was only 18 or 19 years old. But I digress, the GQ Live worked very well. Some pages simply added a little video clip and included a www icon that launched the appropriate website when touched. Others literally made it appear as if the people or items on the page came alive. It was very impressive.

I could imagine this technology being used for other magazines like video game magazines that could better engage the reader and possibly lead to more purchases of the gaming titles. Or how about viewing an article that reviews a product like an iPad and then is able to allow you to see the item in action?

There are many uses for this technology. Maybe the print medium can be revived with this or is this just a temporary bridge until it all become totally digital? What do you think?

Here are a couple of screen shots I grabbed:




Monday, December 17, 2012

Amazon Kindle Fire HD Review

I love Amazon. It is one of the first online stores I ever purchased anything from. I have been an Amazon customer ever since they opened their virtual bookstore door. Amazon remains the top destination for me when I browse for and for when I buy technology. Did I say I love Amazon? Yes, because I do!

I don't like the Kindle Fire HD 7", Dolby Audio, Dual-Band Wi-Fi, 16 GB tablet as much as I thought I would. I wanted to like it. No, really! I wanted to love it. When I pay cash for something I want to love it. If it was a review unit, then I might get away with "liking" it. I bought the Fire HD on Grey Thursday (aka Thanksgiving day) for $199 from Office Max.

I bought the Kindle Fire HD for my 11 year old daughter because she loves to read. I whould have gotten the Kindle Paperwhite if I wanted her to strictly read, but I wanted her to be able to have some entertainment options as well. This is the exact market that Amazon is targeting - those who like the idea of the Kindle, but who want to do more than read books. This is the same people who might be convinced to get an iPad or an iPad Mini instead and simply load the Amazon Kindle app on it to read their Kindle ebooks. It is also aimed at those who don't want to pay the additional $129 (plus the tax difference) for an iPad mini.

That is exactly me and my situation. I didn't want to fork out the additional cash. Now I am regretting that decision. I am not going to bore you with device specifications because the typical buyer of this category can care less. The few that do, has already viewed those specs elsewhere. I want to focus on the usage experience with attention called to physical features where appropriate.

There is no physical home button. The Kindle Fire HD has a virtual button that appears and disappears when appropriate. Sometimes I am looking for it and it just doesn't appear quickly or with the expected gesture. For the most part it works fine, but the few times that it doesn't can be irritating. The physical button gives a point of reference on the iPad mini that makes finding the other buttons like the power and volume buttons easier.

The power button on the Fire HD is very difficult to locate. This drives me crazy. The power button is designed to not be seen when looking at the device, but it is even hard to see or feel when you are looking for it. Think that is not a big deal? I was just at Best Buy and a older man was in the Customer Service line with his HP all-in-one computer. The tech had it all but one minute when he announce that the "power button is right here!" The man bought it in because he thought it was broke because it would not turn on. Hi-tech gadgets can be intimidating an confusing if it is not obvious.

The volume buttons are almost as hard to find, but I like that once you tap one of the buttons the on screen volume control appears. I like being able to slide the volume slider on screen once a button has been pressed.

The device is small and well built. It feels very solid, but it seems surprisingly heavy. If you have ever held a Kindle, that is simply a ebook reader, you know they are very pleasantly light. This device is not light at all. It feels as heavy as a full size iPad to me in my hand. The Fire HD is actually 13.9 ounces compared to my iPad 3's 22.4 ounces, so it almost half the weight of the big iPad. The iPad Mini weights 10.88 ounces, so while it is lighter - it not lighter by a whole lot. Still, picking up the Kindle Fire HD feels like picking up a toddler and expecting the kid to be light and instead finding the kid to be quite heavy.

The Fire HD feels like I am holding a heavy piece of glass. There is no way I would use this without a case. It just feels like trouble if this thing is dropped just once.

The Fire HD has some great things about it. The sound quality is just incredible. The dual speakers mounted on both sides on the rear of the device. I forgot that we are suppose to hear things in stereo after using my iPads for a couple of years.

I just purchased the Kindle Fire HD for my daughter for Christmas.

I wanted to get the iPad mini because I have tons of hundreds of apps for this platform already. Using my existing Apple ID would allow me use those apps and more on the iPad mini. My main reason to consider the Fire HD was for its parental control features. I want to control what apps, books, music and the other content is available to my kid.

I also want to control how much time is spent on the device and how much time on the types of media.

The Mini's parental controls is very basic. It has a feature called Guided Access which can be activated to lock the device into a single app. The iOS device also has restrictions that let you hide certain built in apps, so that they are not available to used. This feature can not be used with 3rd party apps.

I like the Kindle Fire HD approach better because it allows me to give the kid a list of apps that can used and for a certain amount of time. I can give her 3 hours a day; of which she could read books for the whole 3 hours, but limit the time she has for playing games to an hour.

The pros and cons that helped shape my decision:

Cons
- I would have to buy already purchased apps again
- Not all apps that my kid enjoys on my iPhone and iPad are available on the Kindle Fire HD
- It has Advertising on the lock screen and below selected app on the home screen ($15 to remove)
- Seems heavy for its size
- It can not mirror all of the screen content to my AppleTV
- it is not a "real" Android device so it does not have the customizable features like Nexus 7 might have
- it does not have access to the Google Play store
- the browser crashes constantly

Pros
- The Parental Controls are spot on
- It is $115 cheaper than iPad Mini
- The speaker is much better
- it has a better quality screen with higher resolution

What will it allow her to do? She can load her pictures, music, Kindle books and the some of the popular apps like Angry Birds, Plants and Zombies, Spiderman, Asphalt 7, etc.

I had to remember that I bought this for my eleven old daughter who might not care about these things, plus the Parental Controls weighed in heavily in my buying decision.

Now I have two problems. One my OfficeMax 14 day return period has expired. Plus they charge a 15% restocking fee. Secondly, the iPad Mini is simply impossible to buy.

The reality is that the Kindle Fire HD would be OK for someone that has never owned a tablet. For those that have used an iOS, the Kindle Fire HD would frustrate you something terrible. The sluggishness of the interface and limited amounts of apps and content will drive you batty.

If I had my way, I would have taken it back and gotten the iPad Mini instead. I don't like it either way, but I have a big enough investment into the Apple economy and therefore it will be quite awkward to fit the Kindle Fire HD into our tech setup at the house.

I will give my daughter the option to choose whether she keeps the Kindle Fire HD 7", Dolby Audio, Dual-Band Wi-Fi, 16 GB tablet or request the Apple iPad Mini tablet at Christmas.

Saturday, December 8, 2012

Is Apple Care Plus a Good Thing?

On Dec 8, 2012, at 7:14 AM, Carol wrote:

> I was wondering if most of you found this to be a "GOOD" thing to have or is it for the most part just a waste of money. IMHO the iPad or whatever you are buying should last without paying for extra coverage. Thanks


When Apple inc. introduced AppleCare initially, it only covered
manufacturer defects only. I was never a fan of the old AppleCare and
consequently I recommended the plans offered by Squaretrade.com
instead.

When Sprint started selling the iPhone 4S, Apple offered started
selling AppleCare Plus which included coverage for accidents. Since
then the AppleCare Plus is available to iPads and iPod Touch devices
as well. This change made the insurance something I could recommend.

Like any insurance, it is good if you have it and then have an
incident where you get to use it. If you never have a problem then it
seems like a waste. I have always felt this way about insurance of
every kind. Well I draw the line at Life Insurance. Don't leave loved
ones without any money to bury you, stuck with your bills and no money
to be comfortable without you here to provide for them.

Having said that, I do recommend device insurance for anyone else,
because they may not be as cautious as I am. I get insurance on my
work devices because my job pays for it and it is more critical for
the device to be available at all times.

For my own stuff, I do not. I never get insurance on my own stuff even
though I am one of those crazy people who hand their expensive gadget
over to kids all the time. One of my little nieces loves me because I
am the only person who lets her play with my iPhone or iPad. She is 3
years old.

My own kids have always used my stuff since they were very little. We
have never had an incident with either the boys who are 20 and 24 nor
with the girls who are 11 and 13.

I have never personally broken any the stuff I have paid lots of money
for. I tend to be very careful with them. I did have the Otterbox
case for my iPad 1. Never dropped it though. My wife has the iPad now,
but won't use the Otterbox or any of the other cases. She uses a $5
case with elastic corner holders at each corner because it is pink and
"hers".

I recommend it to anyone that is accident prone. I know people
personally that have broken their iPhone and iPad and did not have
instance. They were not happy. They paid hundreds of dollars to
replace them. Some chose to just keep using it in the broken state.

One of my sons had a iPod touch that he broke but continued to use
with the shattered glass. Actually the younger one owned it and broke
it. I got it replaced, but didn't have to turn it in. He gave it to
the older son who continued to use it because it was still functional.
They must have different rules in Canada where they live. Whatever
insurance he had, it wasn't AppleCare. I took the broken iPod Touch
to the Apple Store her in the USA and paid $99 to replace the whole
unit. The unit had no insurance in their system.

I just bought the girls an iPod Touch 5th gen and Amazon Kindle Fire
HD. Neither have insurance on them. We will see if they will take as
food of care for their own stuff as they have for mine. I have sturdy
cases for both.

They bottom line is I have never been a fan of device insurance. When
I bought my big screen HDTVs, I passed on the insurance. I just bought
a $300 pair of Bose QuietComfort 15 headphones and was offered
insurance of them. I passed. I think Radio Shack turned me against
getting insurance on gadgets; they try to get extra money on every
purchase.

Get all of the facts before you do. What does it costs to replace it
without insurance? Are you the type to buy the next device because it
is "the new one"? The AppleCare Plus is not transferable, so you would
have to buy a new plan with each new device. I personally don't buy
device insurance, but you have to decide for yourself based on your
habits, your environment and your situation.

Thanks,

Carl W. Brooks
Check out my iPad/iOS/Mac technology website
http://www.iamthereforeipad.com

Wednesday, December 5, 2012

iPad Mini vs Kindle Fire HD

Amazon Kindle Fire HD Review

I love Amazon. It is one of the first online stores I ever purchased anything from. I have been an Amazon customer ever since they opened their virtual bookstore door. Amazon remains the top destination for me when I browse for and for when I buy technology. Did I say I love Amazon? Yes, because I do!

I don't like the Amazon Kindle Fire HD! I wanted to like it. No, really I wanted to love it. When I pay cash for something I want to love it. If it is a review unit, I might get away with liking it. I bought the Fire HD on Grey Thursday (aka Thanksgiving day) for $199 from Office Max. 

I bought it for my 11 year old daughter because she loves to read. I really should have gotten the Kindle Paperwhite if I wanted her to strictly read, but I wanted her to be able to have entertainment options as well. This is the exact market that Amazon is targeting - those who like the idea of the Kindle, but who want to do more than read books. This is the same people who might be convinced to get an iPad Mini instead and simply load the Amazon Kindle app on it to read their Kindle ebooks. It is also aimed at those who don't want to pay the additional $129 (plus the tax difference) for an iPad mini. 

That is exactly me and my situation.  I didn't want to fork out the additional cash. Now I am regretting that decision. I am not going to bore you with device specifications because the typical buyer of this category can care less. The few that do, has already viewed those specs elsewhere. I want to focus on the usage experience with attention called to physical features where appropriate.  

There is no physical home button.  The Kindle Fire HD has a virtual button that appears and disappears when appropriate. Sometimes I am looking for it and it just doesn't appear quickly or with the expected gesture. For the most part it works fine, but the few times that it doesn't can be irritating. The physical button gives a point of reference on the iPad mini that makes finding the other buttons like the power and volume buttons easier. 

The power button on the Fire HD  is very difficult to locate. This drives me crazy.  The power button is designed to not be seen when looking at the device, but it is even hard to see or feel when you are looking for it.  Think that is not a big deal? I was just at Best Buy and a older man was in the Customer Service line with his HP all-in-one computer. The tech had it all but one minute when he announce that the "power button is right here!"  The man bought it in because he thought it was broke because it would not turn on. Hi-tech gadgets can be intimidating an confusing if it is not obvious. 

The volume buttons are almost as hard to find, but I like that once you tap one of the buttons the on screen volume control appears. I like being able to slide the volume slider on screen once a button has been pressed. 

The device is small and well built. It feels very solid, but it seems surprisingly heavy. If you have ever held a Kindle, that is simply a ebook reader, you know they are very pleasantly light. This device is not light at all. It feels as heavy as a full size iPad to me in my hand. The Fire HD is actually  13.9 ounces compared to my iPad 3's 22.4 ounces, so it almost half the weight of the big iPad. The iPad Mini weights 10.88 ounces, so while it is lighter - it not lighter by a whole lot.  Still, picking up the Kindle Fire HD feels like picking up a toddler and expecting the kid to be light and instead finding the kid to be quite heavy. 

The Fire HD feels like I am holding a heavy piece of glass. There is no way I would use this without a case. It just feels like trouble if this thing is  dropped just once. 

The Fire HD has some great things about it. The sound quality is just incredible. The dual speakers mounted on both sides on the rear of the device. I forgot that we are suppose to hear things in stereo after using my iPads for a couple of years. 

I just purchased the Kindle Fire HD for my daughter for Christmas. 

I wanted to get the iPad mini because I have tons of hundreds of apps for this platform already.  Using my existing Apple ID would allow me use those apps and more on the iPad mini. My main reason to consider the Fire HD was for its parental control features. I want to control what apps, books, music and the other content is available to my kid. 

I also want to control how much time is spent on the device and how much time on the types of media. 

The Mini's parental controls is very basic. It has a feature called Guided Access which can be activated to lock the device into a single app. The iOS device also has restrictions that let you hide certain built in apps, so that they are not available to used. This feature can not be used with 3rd party apps. 

I like the Kindle Fire HD approach better because it allows me to give the kid a list of apps that can used and for a certain amount of time. I can give her 3 hours a day; of which she could read books for the whole 3 hours, but limit the time she has for playing games to an hour. 

The pros and cons  that helped shape my decision:

Cons
- I would have to buy apps again
- Not all apps that my kid enjoys on my iPhone and iPad  is available on the Kindle Fire HD
- It has Advertising on lock screen and below selected app on the home screen
- Seems heavy for its size

Pros
- The Parental Controls are spot on  
- It is $130 cheaper than iPad Mini
- The speaker is much better

I had to remember that I bought this for my eleven old daughter who might not care about these things, plus the Parental Controls weighed in more for my buying decision. 

Thanks,
 
Carl W. Brooks
Check out my iPad/iOS/Mac technology website

On Dec 5, 2012, at 8:37 AM, Carol wrote:

On Amazon they make a comparison between these two.  Does Apple have their Comparison?  If they do where would I find it.  I didn't see it on their web site.  Thanks